Success Story

A highly dynamic duo

ECOSPEED F 2040

Premium AEROTEC's Varel plant in north Germany produces highly complex machining components made of aluminium and titanium using one of Europe's most advanced pool of machines. And this pool has recently been boosted by a new, highly dynamic duo: A Starrag ECOSPEED F 2040 FMS (Flexible Manufacturing System) consisting of two linked machining centres.


It was almost 20 years ago that Europe's largest aircraft manufacturer first took a chance on the parallel kinematics of the ECOSPEED product lines — a technology that was revolutionary at the time. Thanks to highly dynamic 5-axis simultaneous cutting with a tripod head, these machines still set the benchmark for machining large, complex aluminium structural components today, especially in the aviation industry. Daily tasks include cutting pocket corners with an only slightly inclined land, which requires the angular position to be changed. While standard fork-type milling heads typically make huge swivel movements to do this, parallel kinematics are significantly faster and more dynamic. This is one of the main reasons why 13 ECOSPEED centres are now in use at the Varel site.


"In addition to their reliability, it was the high overall dynamism of the ECOSPEED machines that won us over", explains Christian Welter, Head of Large-Part Production at Premium AEROTEC. "This is why we chose two ECOSPEED F 2040 machines as our latest investment, which have been linked to create a flexible manufacturing system." This is the newest highlight of Hall 8, where Starrag machining centres with a drive power of 120 kW currently take centre stage. Having a large number of similar centres makes it easier to train staff, operate the machinery and perform maintenance, explains Welter, but with each new investment, Starrag and its ECOSPEED product lines must once again face the competition. He adds: "In this tender, we once again saw that the dynamism of the machine is still in a league of its own. But despite this, in the future we will continue to explore other options on the market." 


A new angled milling head that can be changed automatically now enables aluminium workpieces measuring up to four metres long to be machined on the FMS — not just completely but in a single clamping position too. Flexibility is a must, since the aircraft manufacturer currently machines 700 different components on its ECOSPEED machining centres alone, for clients including Airbus and the European Space Agency (for Ariane 6).

The most advanced pool of machines in Europe has recently acquired a Starrag ECOSPEED F 2040 FMS, which comprises two linked machining centres.

What's more, this investment in new, even more productive technology is happening in a production environment that is currently undergoing big changes. "This is a permanent construction site", says Welter, smiling. "More and more sensors are being built into the machines, which generate a lot of data. We're currently in the process of learning how to handle and utilise this huge quantity of data". One of the key aims of digitalising production is to allow the process to be carried out with only a few operators, or even no operators at all. 

The new Starrag manufacturing system complements this strategy perfectly because the Varel plant has recently switched to using linked systems. "We want to keep set-up separate from actual machining", says Welter. "And this works extremely well with the new ECOSPEED F 2040 FMS, where we have operators work at separate set-up stations". 

The Varel plant has been pursuing digitalisation for a long time now, since before the term "Industrie 4.0" was even coined. Consequently, the company has a systematic focus on networking. "For example, we don't have any standalone Starrag machining centres; they are all networked or linked to each other", explains Welter. "There is also the factor of security of supply, which we must be able to offer as a manufacturer of Airbus components. This is why, next to each machine, there's another one that can perform the same tasks".

So why not adopt robot handling? "The FMS currently machines 40 different components, which means we would have needed 40 actuators for the workpiece holder", explains Welter. "It also became apparent that the robot would be stationary most of the time. A cobot system would be an interesting way of facilitating set-up here. We are already robotising certain areas of small parts manufacturing, however". 

It is difficult for Welter to quantify the impact that Starrag's claim "Engineering precisely what you value" has had on his machine pool. The new investment has not been used for series production for long, he says, but its running time is 10% to 15% shorter than that of older ECOSPEED systems. 
Machine availability plays an equally big part in production at Varel, and it all comes down to manufacturer support. "Overall, we are extremely happy with the service that Starrag offers compared to that of other manufacturers", says Welter. "We've developed an excellent relationship with staff at Starrag over a very long period of time. In particular with regard to certain companies, where, due to rebranding, it's not always clear who's responsible for what". 

Technology in detail

The new flexible manufacturing system (FMS) consists of two ECOSPEED F 2040s, a conveyor system with double loading trolley, a ground-level set-up point, and storage for machine pallets measuring 2,000 mm x 4,000 mm. The machining centres operate at a nominal output of 120 kW and a nominal speed of 30,000 rpm. The duo enables highly dynamic five-axis simultaneous machining with up to 1-g acceleration and a maximum jolt of 250 m/s³. The FMS boasts an angled milling head with an HSK A63/80 interface. This head can be changed automatically and receives tools from the tool change system automatically too. It also carries out cutting and drilling operations, which used to be done on a machine supplied by one of Starrag's competitors. 
To keep the footprint small, save space and facilitate maintenance, auxiliary units and control cubicles are installed on a peripheral platform above the conveyor system. A spindle monitoring system detects process fluctuations and stops the machine if it looks likely to overload. Owing to the high cutting rate of up to 95%, aluminium chips fall with a volume of 220 litres N each minute. A chip extraction system underneath the machine crushes these chips and transports them through pipelines into the chip unit using a vacuum.

Profile

Premium AEROTEC GmbH is a manufacturer of structures and manufacturing systems for aircraft construction (10,000 employees, turnover around EUR 2.0 billion) and has its headquarters in Augsburg, Germany. The company was formed in 2009 when the EADS plant in Augsburg was merged with the Airbus Deutschland plants in Nordenham and Varel. The production facility in Varel (near Wilhelmshaven) plays an important role: The plant was established in 1936 as an engine factory (engine overhauling, spare parts production for truck and aircraft engines). Today it employs around 1,600 staff and produces nearly 5 million components a year, making it one of the world's leading high-tech sites for aircraft construction. The company helped to develop the Varel Aeropark, which is now home to the supplier ThyssenKrupp Aerospace Germany GmbH and the Ausbildungszentrum Varel (AZV) national training centre, where Premium AEROTEC production specialists are trained. 


www.premium-aerotec.com

I have been informed that I can withdraw my consent to the processing of my personal data at any time. Withdrawal shall not affect the legality of any data processing already carried out before withdrawing my consent. By providing my consent, I confirm that I am aged 16 years or older. I hereby consent to the processing of my data. I give my consent voluntarily. I know that this declaration of consent will be saved.